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May 06,2021

by Grace Banks

Miista Fix It SZN with Celine Semaan

Miista Fix It SZN with Celine Semaan

Designer, writer and founder of Slow Factory Foundation, based in New York

As the founder of Slow Factory Foundation, you have seen a lot of talk about being a sustainable consumer. You run an upcycling class ‘Open Education’ online. What is upcycling and reusing so important within this conversation?

You know, most of us don't even own a needle and thread and I feel like this knowledge has disappeared in a way. And so that's why through Open Education, we have these upcycling classes, and they're definitely about mending or reusing or giving your garment a second life. We're very much interested in reconnecting with this craft and this knowledge. I feel like our mothers knew how to fix just about anything, or at least our grandmothers. And for our generation, we just don’t know. So basically, our relationship to mending is that it’s a lost knowledge and lost wisdom from one generation to another. We need to be more fluent in mending or upcycling.

With all the research you’re doing with Slow Factory, do you think that in this period of austerity that people will be more interested in preserving their clothes a bit longer, keeping things and mending them?

Definitely. And I know of a lot of projects that are happening right now, around mending and around upcycling. I just saw on an Instagram account somebody take a piece of clothing and turn it into a bag. There's definitely this upcycling movement that has been ongoing for a long, long time. What I find interesting in how upcyclers are creating amazing new products that make hypebeast people care about sustainability, and that’s incredible.

When did you realise that you wanted to create change in the area of sustainability and fashion? 

I kind of choose fashion as a medium. Someone could choose cinema as a medium, someone could choose music as a medium. I chose fashion as my medium because it was a utilitarian industry. It belongs to everybody. You know, it's the most democratic form of art, and I wanted to work in that space.

What are you working on with Slow Factory now? 

We’re working on Open Education, a platform offering free education for all. It's supported by the public and we would love to encourage more donations so that we can keep this programme going [https://slowfactory.foundation/open-education].

JessM JournalQuoterelease-1

May 06,2021

by Grace Banks

Miista Fix It SZN with Celine Semaan

Miista Fix It SZN with Celine Semaan

Designer, writer and founder of Slow Factory Foundation, based in New York

As the founder of Slow Factory Foundation, you have seen a lot of talk about being a sustainable consumer. You run an upcycling class ‘Open Education’ online. What is upcycling and reusing so important within this conversation?

You know, most of us don't even own a needle and thread and I feel like this knowledge has disappeared in a way. And so that's why through Open Education, we have these upcycling classes, and they're definitely about mending or reusing or giving your garment a second life. We're very much interested in reconnecting with this craft and this knowledge. I feel like our mothers knew how to fix just about anything, or at least our grandmothers. And for our generation, we just don’t know. So basically, our relationship to mending is that it’s a lost knowledge and lost wisdom from one generation to another. We need to be more fluent in mending or upcycling.

With all the research you’re doing with Slow Factory, do you think that in this period of austerity that people will be more interested in preserving their clothes a bit longer, keeping things and mending them?

Definitely. And I know of a lot of projects that are happening right now, around mending and around upcycling. I just saw on an Instagram account somebody take a piece of clothing and turn it into a bag. There's definitely this upcycling movement that has been ongoing for a long, long time. What I find interesting in how upcyclers are creating amazing new products that make hypebeast people care about sustainability, and that’s incredible.

When did you realise that you wanted to create change in the area of sustainability and fashion? 

I kind of choose fashion as a medium. Someone could choose cinema as a medium, someone could choose music as a medium. I chose fashion as my medium because it was a utilitarian industry. It belongs to everybody. You know, it's the most democratic form of art, and I wanted to work in that space.

What are you working on with Slow Factory now? 

We’re working on Open Education, a platform offering free education for all. It's supported by the public and we would love to encourage more donations so that we can keep this programme going [https://slowfactory.foundation/open-education].

JessM JournalQuoterelease-1