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May 06,2021

by Grace Banks

Miista Fix It SZN with Pam Nasr

Miista Fix It SZN with Pam Nasr

Director, art director and stylist of Clams Casino the film, based in New York.

Are there any childhood memories that you think have worked their way into your aesthetic when you direct?

Absolutely, there are a few moments associated to creativity and fashion with my
parents which have definitely shaped my directing eye today. I remember picking out my
dad’s outfit for a night out when I was about three years old. Like, from, you know, the
tie and shirt to go with the suit, coordinating the belt with the shoes and socks. I recall
him telling me many years later that it had all matched and ended up wearing it. That's
been our relationship ever since, he’s always instilled so much courage and faith in me.
And with my mom, there are way too many to count because she's the biggest fashion
diva! We used to shop for my clothes flicking through catalogues, magazine catalogues,
and envisioning what styles we liked the most on me. It's kind of mind boggling that
that's how we did it because this style of shopping feels like a lifetime ago, my mom
definitely wanted the most unique outfits for me. That's a very special memory I have
with my mom because from a very young age, she allowed me to confidently express
myself through clothing.

Do you have any of your mum's stuff? 

Oh, I have a lot of her stuff. She had an elaborate collection of big clip-on earrings,
really chunky ones which I started to wear about 10 years back. They have now
become my wardrobe staple. But I think the most precious item that I've taken from her
are these white leather, kitten heel boots. They have a narrow pointy toe and I just
adore them, they don’t make them this pointy anymore! I wore them to death during summers, now I’m really picky about when to put them on. I keep them intact by re-
polishing them at home, which I do after every wear.

Your film Clams Casino (2018) encapsulates so much of your cultural references. How did you formulate that idea?

I really put everything into that film. At the time, it was super instinctual. Clams Casino
came out about when I discovered the online phenomenon called Mukbang which
originated in South Korea, and not many people knew about it at the time. And it really
took me by surprise. Clams Casino was a result of me trying to understand the
phenomenon and expressing it from a personal viewpoint. I still feel like it's very
relevant today because, you know, we're all using our devices to connect. At the time
though, I interpreted Mukbang as a diversion from reality, as a tool for people to heal
themselves from loneliness or from being misunderstood. In today’s world, online
platforms like Mukbang are used as a means of survival.

You were born in Dubai, then you moved to London as a student and then to New
York, and recently spent more time in Beirut. How have the places you lived
impacted your work?

There’s a common thread holding all the cities I’ve lived in and that’s the hybridity of
cultures and religions. I never felt like I necessarily belonged to one place, and find that
in my work, I catch myself reflecting on the themes of hybridity that I’ve always
celebrated.

JessM JournalQuoterelease-1

May 06,2021

by Grace Banks

Miista Fix It SZN with Pam Nasr

Miista Fix It SZN with Pam Nasr

Director, art director and stylist of Clams Casino the film, based in New York.

Are there any childhood memories that you think have worked their way into your aesthetic when you direct?

Absolutely, there are a few moments associated to creativity and fashion with my
parents which have definitely shaped my directing eye today. I remember picking out my
dad’s outfit for a night out when I was about three years old. Like, from, you know, the
tie and shirt to go with the suit, coordinating the belt with the shoes and socks. I recall
him telling me many years later that it had all matched and ended up wearing it. That's
been our relationship ever since, he’s always instilled so much courage and faith in me.
And with my mom, there are way too many to count because she's the biggest fashion
diva! We used to shop for my clothes flicking through catalogues, magazine catalogues,
and envisioning what styles we liked the most on me. It's kind of mind boggling that
that's how we did it because this style of shopping feels like a lifetime ago, my mom
definitely wanted the most unique outfits for me. That's a very special memory I have
with my mom because from a very young age, she allowed me to confidently express
myself through clothing.

Do you have any of your mum's stuff? 

Oh, I have a lot of her stuff. She had an elaborate collection of big clip-on earrings,
really chunky ones which I started to wear about 10 years back. They have now
become my wardrobe staple. But I think the most precious item that I've taken from her
are these white leather, kitten heel boots. They have a narrow pointy toe and I just
adore them, they don’t make them this pointy anymore! I wore them to death during summers, now I’m really picky about when to put them on. I keep them intact by re-
polishing them at home, which I do after every wear.

Your film Clams Casino (2018) encapsulates so much of your cultural references. How did you formulate that idea?

I really put everything into that film. At the time, it was super instinctual. Clams Casino
came out about when I discovered the online phenomenon called Mukbang which
originated in South Korea, and not many people knew about it at the time. And it really
took me by surprise. Clams Casino was a result of me trying to understand the
phenomenon and expressing it from a personal viewpoint. I still feel like it's very
relevant today because, you know, we're all using our devices to connect. At the time
though, I interpreted Mukbang as a diversion from reality, as a tool for people to heal
themselves from loneliness or from being misunderstood. In today’s world, online
platforms like Mukbang are used as a means of survival.

You were born in Dubai, then you moved to London as a student and then to New
York, and recently spent more time in Beirut. How have the places you lived
impacted your work?

There’s a common thread holding all the cities I’ve lived in and that’s the hybridity of
cultures and religions. I never felt like I necessarily belonged to one place, and find that
in my work, I catch myself reflecting on the themes of hybridity that I’ve always
celebrated.

JessM JournalQuoterelease-1